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child support Archives

How child support works

When child support is awarded following a divorce in Maryland, the noncustodial parent must pay support to the parent who has custody of the child. The first step in determining support arrangements is to establish a relationship with the child. The process of giving birth to a child establishes maternity. With paternity, if a couple is married when their child is born, the husband is typically considered the father. If parents aren't married when a child is born, an Acknowledgment of Paternity Affidavit can be completed by both parents to establish paternity.

Understanding different types of child support cases

When parents in Maryland first get involved with the child support system, they can often find the terminology and bureaucracy to be confusing. In addition, they may have unanswered questions about how exactly the system works. For example, some parents pay child support directly to each other while others make payments through a state system. In order to understand the reasons why cases are handled differently, it is important to know that there are four types of child support cases: IV-D, IV-A, IV-E and non-IV-D.

Forgiveness is important when it comes to co-parenting

Ideally, a person in a committed relationship wouldn't take steps to hinder their partner's ability to earn money or chase a dream. However, some Maryland residents could do just that without even realizing it. If a couple with children gets divorced, the custodial parent may be tempted to turn the case over to the authorities if back child support is owed. This could have negative consequences for both the noncustodial parent and kid.

Child support enforcement a federal priority

When families in Maryland have to deal with issues related to unpaid child support, the effect on the children involved can be significant, especially when their parent struggles to make ends meet and keep the bills paid. Because of the potential for serious impact on the well-being of the children involved, child support enforcement against delinquent parents is a major priority for federal and state agencies. One of the most effective means of successfully collecting unpaid child support has been wage garnishment and payroll collection.

People may use gig work to evade child support

Gig work is becoming increasingly popular in Maryland. Many people are turning to online platforms to supplement their incomes or to serve as their sole incomes. While the gig economy has provided an alternative means for people to earn a living, some people who are trying to evade their child support obligations are using gig work to their advantage.

When DNA tests may be ordered to establish paternity

Unmarried parents in Maryland may need to get DNA tests in order to establish paternity for the purposes of child support, child custody and visitation. When parents are unmarried when the children are born, the men are not automatically deemed to be the fathers. Instead, they are known as alleged fathers until their paternity is established.

Getting a child support agreement

Divorcing Maryland parents have multiple options when it comes to obtaining child support. They can take part in informal negotiations with the assistance of their respective attorneys or use alternative dispute resolution proceedings that take place away from the court. No matter how an agreement is reached, it will likely still be necessary to obtain court approval to verify that it is in compliance with child support state regulations.

Possible uses of child support

Some divorced Maryland parents have the misconception that child support is designed to cover only a child's most basic needs, such as clothing and food. The reality is that it may cover a variety of expenses, and parents may benefit from a full understanding of the purpose of child support.

Seeking changes of custody

When Maryland parents of young children end their marriage, one person will normally be granted primary physical custody with the other parent being given visitations rights, although in some cases, shared custody is granted. Once custody is established, it may be changed if the circumstances of one or both parents change.

Age is not the only factor when determining child support

Maryland residents may believe that child support ends when a child reaches the age of majority at 18 or 21. However, this is not necessarily the case. Sometimes, a parent is obligated to continue providing support for a special needs child well into adulthood. It is also possible that a parent can ask to terminate a support order because that child has been legally emancipated.